You’ve heard the saying. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Don’t fall for health scams, especially those that involve weight loss.

The Federal Trade Commission says in 2011, more than five million people were victims of fraud involving weight loss products. That’s twice as many claims as the next-biggest category of fraud claims which was for prize promotions.

Watch Out for Claims

The Food and Drug Administration says to watch out for some key claims products and companies make.

It’s natural. Natural does not mean safe. Something that says it’s a natural way to lose weight in your sleep is probably a scam. Also, something that claims you can lose weight quickly and easily without diet or exercise is also probably a scam.

If something claims it is a miracle cure, it probably isn’t. One pill cannot treat many different illnesses or ailments. Claims of success from doctors or happy customers can be easily fabricated. Anything that says you will definitely have a certain result in a specific length of time is probably a scam. Every body is different, so there is no way to make a specific claim.

Act fast. If a company asks you to pay in advance or pressures you to buy, it may be a scam. You should have the time to get the facts about any product you’re thinking of buying. Also, be wary of free trials. Some companies will delay shipments until it is too late to cancel the trial and charge your credit card.

The FDA says be smart, be aware, and be careful.

Detox Dangers

Be wary of anything that says you need to use their product to detox your body. There is no miracle pill, food, or juice that will cleanse your body.

There are also no miracle creams, powders, or pills that can help you lose weight without working at it.

Claims from Friends

This is what happens when spam and dreams of an easy fix come together. You receive an email from a friend about a new weight loss pill that worked great. You’re tempted to try it. Don’t!

Chances are, that friend’s email account or social media feed was hacked. The links in the emails or the post are most-likely fake and could install bad things on your computer or device or drain your wallet.

Phony celebrity endorsements can also be a sign of a fraud.

The Old-Fashioned Way to Lose Weight

It seems simple. Eat less, move more. The FTC says any product or claim saying you can lose more than a pound a week without any work is probably a lie.

Experts recommend reducing calorie intake by about 500 calories a day and exercising to lose about one to two pounds per week.

Before you start any new exercise program, check with a doctor. If you have any pain, contact Flexogenix for an appointment.

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